Is basal cell carcinoma itchy?

When it comes to detecting skin cancer, it's important to understand the possible signs and symptoms. Basal cell carcinoma is the most common form of skin cancer. When found early, there are many treatment options in most cases. That's why the SkinVision program is aimed towards early detection. There are several things to know about basal cell carcinoma - so when these things happen, you'll know what to do.

Basal cell carcinoma’s most common warning signs

There are a few warning signs that different cancer organizations agree on:

  • Open sore: a sore that bleeds, crusts and remains open for a few weeks in a row. After which is could heal up only to then open and bleed again.
  • Scar-like area: a white, yellow or wax-like area on the skin that looks a bit shiny. Resembles an area of scarring.
  • Shiny bump: a bump that is pearly or clear and is the colors that can be seen are often pink, red, or white. But other colors might be visible as well, especially darker colors, which is why it can be confused with a mole.
  • Pink growth: clear pink growth on the skin that may form a thicker border. You might see blood vessels develop on the surface.

What does a normal mole look like?

So, is basal cell carcinoma itchy?

They very well could be. The fifth common warning sign is described as:

  • Reddish patch: this could be an irritated area as well. The patch may form a crust, or it starts to hurt or itch. But sometimes it just exists without any discomfort.

Make sure to perform regular self-checks. Start by joining the SkinVision program and download the app as a first step – which enables you to check for early skin cancer signs.

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